Publications

PhD Thesis

Using Simulations of Black Holes to Study General Relativity and the Properties of Inner Accretion Flow

Hoormann 2016, click reference for link to article

For the Public

Curious Kids: Where Do Black Holes Lead To?

Hoormann, The Conversation 7/9/2019

Analysis Contributions

CIV Black Hole Mass Measurements with the Australian Dark Energy Survey (OzDES)

Hoormann et al 2019, accepted to MNRAS

Quasar Accretion Disk Sizes from Continuum Reverberation Mapping in the DES Standard Star Fields

Yu et al 2018, submitted to ApJ

Quasar Accretion Disk Sizes from Continuum Reverberation Mapping from the Dark Energy Survey

Mudd et al 2017, ApJ 862:123

Design of the Telescope Truss and Gondola for the Balloon-Borne X-ray Polarimeter X-Calibur

Kislat et al 2017, JAI 6:1740003

Studies of the Origin of High-Frequency Quasi-Periodic Oscillations of Mass-Accreting Black Holes in X-ray Binaries with Next-Generation X-Ray Telescopes

Behestipour, Hoormann, Krawczynski 2016, ApJ 826:203

Testing General Realtivity’s No-Hair Theorem with X-Ray Observations of Black Holes

Hoormann, Behestipour, Krawczynski 2016, PRD 93:044020

X-Ray Polarimetry with the Polarizations Spectroscopic Telescope Array (PolSTAR)

Krawczynski et al 2016, APh 75:8

Supernova Classifications

Classification of 26 DES Supernova with OzDES

Calcino et al 2018, ATel 11147

Classification of 25 DES Supernova with OzDES

Calcino et al 2018, ATel 11146

Classification of 17 DES Supernova with OzDES

Hoormann et al 2016, ATel 9855

Data Contributions

First Cosmology Results Using Type Ia Supernova From the Dark Energy Survey: Simulations to Correct Supernova Distance Biases

Kessler et al 2019, MNRAS 485:1171

First Cosmology Results Using Type Ia Supernova From the Dark Energy Survey: Constraints on Cosmological Parameters

Abbott et al 2019, ApJL 872:2

Rapidly Evolving Transients in the Dark Energy Survey

Pursiainen et al 2018, MNRAS 481:894

First Cosmology Results Using Type Ia Supernova From the Dark Energy Survey: Survey Overview and Supernova Spectroscopy

D’Andrea et al 2018, submitted to AJ

First Cosmology Results Using Type Ia Supernova From the Dark Energy Survey: Effects of Chromatic Corrections to Supernova Photometry on Measurements of Cosmological Parameters

Lasker et al 2018, submitted to MNRAS

First Cosmology Results Using Type Ia Supernova From the Dark Energy Survey: Analysis, Systematic Uncertanties, and Validation

Brout et al 2018, submitted to ApJ

First Cosmology Results Using Type Ia Supernova From the Dark Energy Survey: Measurement of the Hubble Constant

Macaulay et al 2018, submitted to MNRAS

Cosmological Constraints from Multiple Probes in the Dark Energy Survey

Abbott et al 2018, arXiv:1811.02375

DES Science Portal: Computing Photometric Redshifts

Gschwend et al 2018, A&C 25:58

Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Galaxy Clustering for Combined Probes

Elvin-Poole et al 2018, PRD 98:042006

Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Redshift Distributions of the Weak-Lensing Source Galaxies

Hoyle et al 2018, MNRAS 478:592

Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Cross-Correlation Redshifts - Methods and Systematics Characterization

Gatti et al 2018, MNRAS 477:1664

OzDES Multifibre Spectroscopy for the Dark Energy Survey: 3-yr Results and First Data Release

Childress et al 2017, MNRAS 472:273

What is with these crazy long author lists?

If you have clicked on the links to the papers you will have seen that many of these papers have very long author lists. You may be wondering how exactly 50+ people contributed to a 15 page paper. This is something that is quite common in observational astronomy research. Many of the surveys like the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and Australian Dark Energy Survey (OzDES) are made up of large collaborations of people. In order to run they require extensive work from the community. These are infrastructure tasks such as building the instruments, doing the observing, performing data reduction, maintaining the database, etc. Like any other academic field the old adage “publish or perish” is true in astronomy as well. While critically important to getting the data necessary to do the cool science, these are often tasks that don’t result in publications of their own. In DES and OzDES the builder system is designed to recognize those who have spent a significant amount of time on the infrastructure of the survey by allowing them to gain authorship on papers that use the survey’s data. Other surveys have similar systems. I am an OzDES builder. I gained this status through regularly going to the telescope to observe, running the weekly telecons, and maintaining the record of everyone in the collaboration’s contribution to the survey. This means that I am allowed to be an author on any paper that directly uses data taken by OzDES. Generally those who directly contributed to the analysis of the paper are first on the author list and then all the builders are listed (in alphabetical order). For papers presenting the key science results from the survey the entire author list is typically alphabetical.